The Woman In Cabin 10

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The Woman In Cabin 10

by Ruth Ware

February 2017

From the second I heard about The Woman In Cabin 10, I wanted to read it. Now that I’m loving thrillers, the synopsis of this one drew me in right away. This one had me on edge every second and I loved it. It was truly an experience reading it and I see why it’s so popular.

Lo is a travel magazine journalist who has gotten the opportunity to take a luxury cruise on a small ship from England to Norway. It’s a great move for her career, but is shadowed by a burglary days before she’s supposed to leave. It shakes Lo up and sets her off for a rough start to her trip. Once aboard, Lo settles in to the small, but divine cruise ship. Everything is designed to bring comfort and luxury to the passenger. Part of Lo’s job is to make connections with the influential people traveling with her, as well as report on her experience. The first night there is a cocktail party and Lo is in the process of getting dressed when she realizes she doesn’t have her mascara. She knocks next door and a young woman opens it and reluctantly gives Lo some mascara. Lo doesn’t see the girl for the rest of the night and is puzzled when she learns that the girl’s cabin (cabin 10) is unoccupied. Later that night Lo is awoken to the sound of a splash. She runs to her balcony convinced she sees a body shaped bundle in the water and a smear of blood on the adjacent balcony. This immediately puts her in a tizzy and after a sleepless night, Lo decides to do some journalistic digging. She questions everyone and tries desperately to find the missing girl. But no one knows her and there is no one is missing in either the guests or crew. The chief of security doesn’t believe Lo, nor does her ex and fellow journalist, Ben. Her only sympathetic ear is Richard, the owner of the cruise ship. Spoilers: Lo’s obsession begins to get her in trouble. Someone is on to her and things start disappearing, like the mascara and her phone. Lo’s anxiety is building as they near the end of the cruise. Her evidence and phone are gone and she’s becoming increasingly more paranoid. Finally, as the boat is nearing port, the missing girl knocks on Lo’s door. Lo follows her, only to get knocked out and locked in a small room in the bowels of the ship. She’s kept hostage for a few days before she starts getting answers. The girl is Richard’s lover, Carrie. His wife is fighting cancer and he wants to be rid of her. So he created a plan to have Carrie disguise herself as his wife, then he knocked out his wife and had Carrie throw her overboard. But Lo knows too much, so Richard has Carrie snatch her, with plans to kill her. Lo is able to turn Carrie onto her side and they plan her escape. Carrie arranges everything and warns Lo not to tell anyone the truth until she’s out of Norway because Richard is influential with the police. Lo’s escape is almost perfect, but she ends up falling overboard and swimming to shore where she ignores Carrie’s advice and tells the police everything. In the nick of time she realizes her mistake as she overhears the police calling Richard. She manages to run away and find help in a local who lets her use his phone to call her boyfriend Judah, who has been worried sick. She finds out later that two bodies have been found: Richard’s and his wife’s. Lo also gets a secret message from Carrie that she escaped (and it’s obvious she killed Richard). Throughout the book, Lo struggles with anxiety and alcoholism and works on handling them, which was an interesting layer that added to the suspense.

Summing it up: This thriller was suspenseful and intense. I thoroughly enjoyed it and highly recommend it!

All the best, Abbey

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