Letters from Paris

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Letters from Paris

by Juliet Blackwell

March 2017

I was beside myself with excitement when I saw Blackwell’s second book, Letters From Paris, on the bookshelf! I adored her first book, The Paris Key (my review here – https://twentyninewillowlane.wordpress.com/2016/11/02/the-paris-key/). Seriously, anything French draws me in and this one was just spectacular. I love Blackwell’s writing and her plots. Once again, I got swept up in Blackwell’s story; wrapped up in her characters’ journeys.

Claire is a successful business woman, but returns home when her grandmother gets sick. There she finds a beautiful plaster mask that she adored as a child. Her mother died in a tragic accident, so her grandmother raised her. Her grandmother’s dying wish is that Claire would go to Paris to find out about the woman behind the mask. Claire agrees and after her grandmother’s passing, she makes plans to go. Once in Paris, Claire quickly finds the shop where the mask, L’Inconnue, was made. She is overwhelmed by the quantity of plaster masks and the abrupt nature the of rugged man running the shop. There’s a young woman translating who helps Claire. When she realizes Claire speaks French, she begs her to stay at the shop and translate while she runs out (since her brother is rather abrupt with customers). Claire agrees as she has nothing else to do and quickly gets caught up in shop life, as well as life in Paris. Spoilers: Claire ends up moving to the shop where Armand, the plasterer, also lives. They start off with a turbulent relationship, which slowly evolves into love as they get to know each other and spend more time together. They share loss of loved ones; Claire, her mother and grandmother and Armand, his daughter. By the end of the book they are a solid couple, strong and secure, not just infatuated with each other. The story of L’Inconnue is woven throughout the book. Sabine is a young girl whose only hope of survival in Paris is by becoming a model for artists (and becoming their lovers). The one artist she models for turns violent over time. She is unhappy, but has some hope as she has fallen in love with another artist, a plasterer. He is determined to free her, so they concoct a crazy plan: Sabine fakes her death and her lover makes her death mask. She is unclaimed, so is forever known as L’Inconnue and is remembered in mystery. In fact, she runs off with her lover, changes her name, and lives a long, respected life as the wife of the plasterer (and that same family has run the shop Claire is working in for years). When Claire discovers that Sabine drowned and later figures out that she faked her death, a few things click into place about her own mother’s death and she finds out that her mother faked her death to get out of a violent relationship. Claire is crushed that her mother would leave her and disappointed that her mother continues to keep her distance. She’s found her new home though and is able to work through the emotional side of things and find happiness!

Summing it up: I adored this book and I absolutely recommend it! I hope you read Blackwell’s books and then tell me what you think!

All the best, Abbey

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